A million new tags in Faviki

September 19, 2008

Faviki is periodically synchronized with Wikipedia and now contains a little less than a million new tags –  around 300.000 new English tags and 669.600 new tags in other languages! That means that currently there are 5.6 million tags in Faviki – 2.7 million English and 2.9 million tags from other 13 languages.

Since the September release and the multi-language tagging feature, you can tag in 14 different languages, and now there are 30% more non-English tags. After English, the largest languages are German (397.8K) and French (388.5K). The fastest growing languages are Italian (51.5% growth) and Polish (44.1%).

Wikipedia/DBpedia growth (values in thousands)

Language DBpedia 3.0* DBpedia 3.1** growth growth (%)
English 2400.0 2700.0 300.0 12.50%
German 335.3 397.8 62.5 18.64%
French 293.4 388.5 95.1 32.41%
Italian 190.7 288.9 98.2 51.49%
Dutch 223.0 288.3 65.3 29.28%
Polish 179.7 259.0 79.3 44.13%
Portuguese 178.7 248.3 69.6 38.95%
Spanish 171.5 228.9 57.4 33.47%
Japanese 164.6 202.3 37.7 22.90%
Russian 117.1 153.6 36.5 31.17%
Swedish 135.5 147.6 12.1 8.93%
Finnish 96.1 115.0 18.9 19.67%
Norwegian 86.9 104.5 17.6 20.25%
Chinese 83.3 102.7 19.4 23.29%
Total (without Eng) 2255.8 2925.4 669.6 29.68%
Total (with Eng) 4655.8 5625.4 969.6 20.83%

* Jan 08, Japanese version was built in November 2007

** Jun & July 08

Number of non-English tags (values in thousands)

Non-English tags growth

Faviki uses the information about tags from DBpedia datasets. DBpedia extracts structured data from Wikipedia, which is constantly growing.  Last release – DBpedia 3.1 has been released recently, marking an increase of 27% over the previous version. The downloads are provided as N-Triples and in CSV format on this page.

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One Response to “A million new tags in Faviki”


  1. […] What’s the source of these results anway? SemantiFind’s recommended results seem to rely entirely on input generated by users – to add input, you need to install their toolbar and start adding labels to websites; if a website has been labeled before, you can confirm or reject existing labels. What’s nice: a label recommender (only presumably the same one that’s used for search queries) reduces ambiguity. What’s curious: You can also browse the pages you have already labeled in what they call your “catalogue” – which makes the service even more reminiscent of a bookmarking service, and which makes me wonder whether one shouldn’t possibly link this with a del.icio.us/Mr.Wong/Bibsonomy/Faviki account (Faviki would probably be the best, considering their tag recommendations are based on DBpedia, and considering that Faviki just made it past the 1 million tags mark) […]


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